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ANOTHER Update on the Adler

ANOTHER Update on the Adler

So it seems the closer we get to a resolution, the more questions arise.  Below is a quick outline of what is happening at the moment in regards to the Adler.

 

Potential Licensing Changes

 

Since I last wrote on the Adler last, nothing has changed.  But there are some potential changes being discussed tomorrow.

There are two possibilities;

  • Changes to the National Firearms agreement, which the states would be forced to accept
  • Changes to state legislation

The discussions that are taking place are predominately around changes to the National Firearms Agreement.  Changes to state legislation are unlikely to happen in the short term due to the law reform review having to be considered – this is unlikely to happen until after the State Election (March).

Changes to the National Firearms Agreement needs to be accepted by all the states to pass.  Up until recently changes have been blocked by NSW.

This Friday, there is going to be another meeting by the states to discuss changes to the National Firearms agreement.  Allegedly, all the states will accept changes to recategorize lever action shotguns.

What Could Happen?

We still don’t have firm indication of exactly what changes will take place, but if changes happen, there are a couple of possibilities.

  • 5 Shot Adler Shotguns
    • Retain categorization as category A
      • If the states can’t agree in the recategorization, then there will be no changes to legislation and lever action shotguns will remain category A, with no magazine restrictions

 

  • Recategorisation to category B
    • Changes to genuine need requirements – required to establish a need over a category A shotgun
  • Recategorisation to category C
    • Changes to genuine need requirements – required to establish genuine need over a category B. Primary production only
  • Recategorisation to cat D
    • Prohibited

 

  • Adler shotguns with more than 5 shot magazine capacity
    • Retain categorization of category A
    • Recategorisation to category B
      • Changes to genuine need requirements – required to establish a need over a category A shotgun
  • Recategorisation to category C
    • Changes to genuine need requirements – required to establish genuine need over a category B. Primary production only.
  • Recategorisation to category D
    • Prohibited

 

If any of the shotgun variations are recategorized to category B, nothing will happen.

If any of the shotgun variations are recategorized as category C, license applications will be extremely difficult to get approved, but existing license holders will not be required to hand their firearms in.

If any of the shotgun variations are recategorized at category D, the shotguns will be moved into a category that is prohibited to license.  We are not sure at this stage whether this will mean the shotguns will be seized or if they will remain on the owners license (but cannot be sold).

My Prediction

Based on discussions that have taken place so far, if a recategorization takes place, I believe 5 shot lever action shotguns will go to category B, with larger capacity shotguns going to category C.

This is entirely a political issue, not a public safety issue, and the result will be a political result.  Recategorization to category B for 5 shot shotguns and category C for larger capacity will be a political compromise that attempts to appease the Liberal Democrats and the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party, while still justifying the discussion in the first place and confirming the need to be fearful (recategorization confirms that the gun is dangerous and you should be afraid).

This will mean that 5 shot shotguns will be licensed as normal.  If a license holder has a shotgun with a larger magazine capacity licensed, they will be able to keep it, but it will be very difficult or impossible to get one licensed.

 

Surmise

So right now, you can get an Adler licensed without issue.  You can extend the magazine with no issues.

My prediction is, if they change the legislation, you will be able to keep your Adler shotgun regardless of the magazine length.  However, you will not be able to get one licensed with a magazine capacity greater than 5 and we will not be able to modify your shotgun to take extra rounds.

 

Zaine Beaton

Manager

 

If you wish to comment or provide feedback on Zaine’s blog you can contact him via the email address –zaine@beatonfirearm.onpressidium.com


This email address is for contacting Zaine in direct relation to blog articles only – not for general correspondence or sales inquiries.  For sale inquiries, please visit our Contact Us page.


Please keep in mind that these are Zaine’s personal comments – they are not a reflection of the opinions of any other staff or directors of Beaton Firearms.

 

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